Monthly Archives: June 2016

Tips for Writing Your Performance Evaluation

unduhan-15Self-assessments, also known as self-appraisals or self-evaluations, are popular tools used by management to learn how employees view their own performance. Theses assessments help close the gap between expectations and performance, and provide a channel to open communication about goals, opportunities and development.

While managers and supervisors share their opinions of employee performance and ability to meet expectations during evaluations, the self-assessment lets employees discuss what they see as important projects completed, share new skills and techniques acquired, and remind employers of all the great work they have done since the last performance review.

Writing a self-assessment

Writing a self-evaluation can be difficult for many employees. Despite knowing themselves and their work better than anyone, employees can struggle to summarize it in a way that comes off as objective, rather than conceited.

Here are a few tips to help you with your assessment.

1. Be proud

The main goal of the self-evaluation is to highlight your accomplishments. Employees need to point to specific tasks and projects that highlight their best work. When describing those accomplishments, employees should be sure to emphasize the impact each of those achievements had on the business as a whole, in order to show how valuable their work is to the company.

Julie Rieken, CEO of evaluation software company Trakstar, noted that employees should connect their actions with a manager’s goals.

“If your manager needs to hit a certain number, share how you played a role in hitting the number,” Rieken said in a blog post. “Accomplishments you list should connect with business objectives.”

2. Be honest

Honesty is another critical aspect of writing a self-review. It’s more than likely that the boss knows when a good job was done, so trying to highlight a project or task that was just OK, rather than great, won’t have much impact.

Being honest also means pointing out some areas that could be improved. Timothy Butler, a senior fellow and director of career-development programs at Harvard Business School, advised employees to use developmental language when critiquing the areas in which they need to improve.

“You don’t want to say, ‘Here’s where I really fall down,'” Butler told the Harvard Business Review. “Instead, say, ‘Here’s an area I want to work on. This is what I’ve learned. This is what we should do going forward.'”

3. Ask about career-development opportunities

Butler also encouraged employees to use their self-evaluations as a time to ask their bosses for career-development opportunities. This should occur even if the employer isn’t asking the employee for it, because if you don’t ask, it likely won’t happen, he said. By showing an interest, you put it in your manager’s mind that you are interested, and he or she is more likely to be on the lookout for tasks, assignments and training prospects for you

4. Be professional

Finally, employees need to remember to always be professional when writing self-assessments. This means they should avoid using it as an opportunity to bash the boss for poor leadership skills or criticize co-workers for making the employees’ lives more difficult.

Being professional also means giving the appraisal its due attention, like any other important project that crosses your desk. Dominique Jones, chief people officer at Halogen Software, advised treating your self-appraisal like a work of art that builds over time. You’ll be much happier with the end result if you give yourself time to reflect and carefully support your self-assessment, she said.

“Use examples to support your assertions, and … make sure that you spell- and grammar-check your documents,” Jones wrote in a blog post. “These are all signs of how seriously you take the process and its importance to you.”

Salary Negotiation Tips for Women

Most professionals have been asked what their current salary is during a job interview. This question allows companies to base your new salary offer on your company’s identification of your worth, rather than what you’re actually worth.

For women — who, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, are paid an average of 79 cents for every dollar that men earn — the salary question also makes it easier for employers to perpetuate the gender pay gap.

Massachusetts is taking a step toward combating that practice. This month, Massachusetts became the first state to bar employers from asking about applicants’ salaries before offering them a job, the New York Times reported. The new law, which goes into effect in July 2018, will require hiring managers to state a compensation figure upfront — based on what an applicant’s worth is to the company, rather than on what he or she made in a previous position.

“Professionals should be paid based upon their skills, experience and the value they bring to a position, not by their negotiation skills or salary history,” said Amanda Augustine, career advice expert for TopResume. “The recent law that Massachusetts passed is an important step to closing the wage gap between men and women of equal talents and abilities.”

According to Augustine, women are less likely to negotiate a job offer, setting themselves up to lose hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of their careers.

From the time women are young, they’re programmed to think and act a certain way, Augustine said. In Sheryl Sandberg’s book, “Lean In,” she discusses how it starts as early as the playground. The little boys are considered “leaders,” while the little girls who act the same are labeled “bossy.”

“Many women are scared to negotiate because they’re afraid of being considered too pushy,” Augustine said. “There is a fear that if they demand more money, the job offer will be revoked. They’re overly concerned about being polite, often to the detriment of their paychecks.”

In addition, women often feel they need to prove their value before they can ask for more money. Men, on the other hand, often enter these conversations expecting to ask for, and receive, a better job offer.

“The fact of the matter is, if you don’t ask for what you want, you won’t get it,” Augustine said. “You have to negotiate.”

 She offered four tips to help you negotiate the compensation package you deserve:

Do your homework. If you’re going to negotiate confidently, you need to be prepared. Research the market rate for your position by visiting Glassdoor.com, Salary.com and PayScale.com, taking into account the company’s location, size and industry.

Focus on your current and future value. What do you bring to the table? Make a list of your major contributions and accomplishments, quantifying them whenever possible. How have you (or will you be able to) cut costs, increase revenue, streamline efficiency, improve customer satisfaction, etc.?

Remember, it’s not personal. Negotiation isn’t about one person winning and the other losing. It’s about each party giving a little to keep or get what they want most. Leave emotions at the door. If you feel your emotions rising, hold off negotiating until you can pull it together.

Fake it till you make it. Confidence is essential to being a strong negotiator. You must exude self-assurance, even if you insecure or uncertain. Don’t apologize for negotiating — own it. All too often, women apologize when they’ve done nothing wrong and, as a result, are viewed by men as being weak or lacking conviction. Don’t let yourself fall into that trap.

“Not every great employee is a great negotiator,” Augustine told Business News Daily. “If [you don’t] possess stellar negotiation skills, there’s no reason why you should tolerate earning less money than an equally qualified candidate who does.”